louderthanlifeitself said: Can you let me know what you find on staff turnover related to the multiple patients? It's becoming a huge problem on our floor and hospital. You short staff us, especially with new hire as it ruins productivity, the nurses burn out, quit and you have to hire new people. They don't wan to hear us and I've already showed the. 5 articles about it already. So let me know what you find. I think this is a huge issue and I want to change it, or at least try to

adenosinetriesphosphate:

Hello louderthanlifeitself! I hate that you are going through this at your hospital. I take it you live outside of California so you probably don’t have established patient-nurse ratios. Terrible.

It’s great that you are trying to change things! Even if you don’t hear it enough at work, know that you are a wonderful nurse. We have to advocate for our patients and their safety—as well as our own—even if management doesn’t agree.

Most of my research is on new graduate transition but I have ran across a few articles recently that may benefit you:

Nurse staffing, medical staffing, and mortality in Intensive Care: an observational study. I wish I had the hard copy in my hand (I left it in my office). This is a very current article. I read this a few weeks ago and I believe the numbers say something like for every patient you add to a nurses’ workload you increase mortality 7% for every patient she has. Something crazy like that.

A few others I’ve read are:
Upenieks, V. (2005, April). Recruitment and retention strategies: a magnet hospital prevention model. MEDSURG Nursing, 21-29. Retrieved from http://libproxy.lib.csusb.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=aph&AN=16757155&site=ehost-live

Jones, C. B. (2008, January). Revisiting nurse turnover costs. Journal of Nursing Administration, 38(1), 11-18.

Boychuk Duchscher, J., & Myrick, F. (2008, October). The prevailing winds of oppression: understanding the new graduate experience in acute care. Nursing Forum, 43, 191-206. http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1744-6198.2008.00113.x

I think they each have elements that are applicable to what you are talking about. Here’s another one, but it’s in my “to read” pile so I’m not sure if it will fit or not:

Shared Values: Impact on staff nurse job satisfaction and perceived productivity.

If you attended a university you should have access to these through your EBSCOHost - type search engines. If not, you may be able to access them either through your hospital’s intranet or at a local library.

Don’t give up! Management made arguments in CA about staff ratios and how they wouldn’t be cost-effective but obviously they were incorrect because it works out just fine. Additionally, safer ratios result in less errors, adverse events, turnover, and higher patient satisfaction scores which all equals more money for the hospital.

Finally I would also read your nursing contract (if you have one and are in a union) as well as your hospital’s policies on staffing. Make sure they are acting correctly within those guidelines. Refer to this, it states the guidelines in which we can accept, reject or object to taking patients. If you believe an assignment is unsafe you can reject or object in writing.

"Registered nurses have a professional obligation to raise concerns regarding any patient assignment that puts patients or themselves at risk for harm."

I hope all of this helps!

Reblogged from Florence's Nightingale
nursegif:

WHEN A PATIENT IS BECOMING CRITICAL

nursegif:

WHEN A PATIENT IS BECOMING CRITICAL

Reblogged from Nursing Student 911

So let me get this straight:

dink-182:

hungrylikethewolfie:

daisyunderthestars:

People are boycotting Kraft just because of this one ad

image

yet

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no one

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sees

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a

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problem

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with

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these ones?

Wow, when you put it that way it almost seems like we live in a rampantly sexist, misogynistic, and hypocritical society.

Yes we do my friend. Yes we do.

shoelace87:

intrainingdoc:

Learn your surgical terms! This is a lifesaver for students in the operating room.

Just a cutesy lil FYI

shoelace87:

intrainingdoc:

Learn your surgical terms! This is a lifesaver for students in the operating room.

Just a cutesy lil FYI

Reblogged from Night Nurse Notes
scienceyoucanlove:

A visual guide to understand different types of strokeIschemic Stroke: The most common type of stroke is known as an ischemic stroke. Nearly nine out of 10 strokes fall into this category. The culprit is a blood clot that obstructs a blood vessel inside the brain. The clot may develop on the spot or travel through the blood from elsewhere in the body.Hemorrhagic Stroke: Hemorrhagic strokes are less common but far more likely to be fatal. They occur when a weakened blood vessel in the brain bursts. The result is bleeding inside the brain that can be difficult to stop.Source and more information: http://bit.ly/1wczCSm
through Daily Anatomy

scienceyoucanlove:

A visual guide to understand different types of stroke

Ischemic Stroke: The most common type of stroke is known as an ischemic stroke. Nearly nine out of 10 strokes fall into this category. The culprit is a blood clot that obstructs a blood vessel inside the brain. The clot may develop on the spot or travel through the blood from elsewhere in the body.

Hemorrhagic Stroke: Hemorrhagic strokes are less common but far more likely to be fatal. They occur when a weakened blood vessel in the brain bursts. The result is bleeding inside the brain that can be difficult to stop.

Source and more information: http://bit.ly/1wczCSm

through Daily Anatomy

Reblogged from SoSanguineRN
usmlenotes:

Cardiac Markers!

usmlenotes:

Cardiac Markers!

Reblogged from Always;